Video: Sick 2.0 Twin Turbo BBC Dyno Mule Twists Needle to 3,625 HP

Tom Bailey has a passion for building cars–and engines–that the rest of us look at and say “someday, when I hit the lottery, I’ll build one of those.” Bailey’s insane “Project Sick Seconds” (seen here on Dragzine) and “Sick 2.0”, currently under construction, are some of the most incredible drag machines we’ve ever seen.

Sick Seconds (foreground) and Sick 2.0 (background).

Sick Seconds (foreground) and Sick 2.0 (background).

Bailey’s Skinny Kid Race Cars-built, ’69 Camaro tube-chassis Sick 2.0 is currently awaiting a trip to the 2015 edition of Hot Rod‘s Drag Week torture test event, where he fully expects to run in the 5-second quarter-mile zone with ease. How, you ask? To start, with the engine seen in this video currently undergoing testing at none other than Steve Morris Engines in Muskegon, Michigan. Once all of the testing has been completed with the test mule, the final pieces will find their way into a billet version of the engine. More on this coming later!

Engine Cut Out Top V1

Top view of the engine. All photos graciously provided by Steve Morris Engines.

Bailey’s do-it-all mantra for the project has led Morris down the path of building an insane 615 cubic inch big-block Chevy engine with two separate fuel systems – one system with a pair of Billet Atomizer 500 lb./hr fuel injectors per cylinder to push the correct amount of methanol fuel into the cylinders during race time, and a second system plumbed into the underside of the manifold that runs on premium pump fuel and is acceptable for use during the cruise portion of the event.

The engine is similar to the engine that’s in Bailey’s first iteration of Sick Seconds, but Morris has made a few changes based on the experience the team had with that configuration.

Most importantly, the new version of the bullet has been converted to the aforementioned methanol fuel, along with the use of a new dry sump oiling system. Unlike anyone else in the world, Bailey has plans to not only run the new car on Drag Week, he also has designs of competing in the PDRA in the Pro Boost category among others. That’s right–he’s going to take a street-legal racecar and pit it against the best of the best in the world on the dragstrip.

Various views of the engine.

The 4.840-inch bore space engine (stock big-block Chevy dimensions) used as the test mule is based around a Brodix cast aluminum block and cylinder heads that have been modified with SME’s port and combustion chamber profiles. Diamond pistons and MGP aluminum connecting rods are tapped to take the combustion pressure and turn it into horsepower.

No words needed!

No words needed!

The engine relies on a Peterson Fluid Systems dry-sump oil pump and Moroso dry sump oil pan. The fuel pump is one of Aeromotive‘s Atomic units mounted to the front of the oil pump with a hex drive, and runs in concert with the belt from the engine. This ensures that if the belt happens to break, both oil and fuel are shut down, preventing the potential for engine damage in that situation.

Jesel valvetrain is used with modifications spec’d out by Morris to ensure longevity in the demanding conditions; one of Morris’ own Ram’s Horn-style billet inlets is used in front of the SME billet intake manifold. All of this horsepower madness is controlled by a Morris-tuned Holley Dominator EFI system.

The monstrous power levels are reached through the use of a pair of 98mm Precision turbochargers, controlled by a pair of Turbosmart USA‘s 60mm PowerGate wastegates, complete with position sensors, and dual Big Bubba CNC-machined blowoff valves.

How monstrous, you ask? The dyno mule cranks out 3,625 horsepower and 2,540 lb.-ft. of torque at 35.7 pounds of boost pressure and 7,500 rpm.

morris

Take a glance at those power numbers – from 4,500-7,500 rpm the engine gains nearly 2,000 horses. We can’t even comprehend that kind of power. Steve Morris is a bad, bad man.

Even better – Morris and the guys aren’t done with development just yet, and may see even more power once the process is complete. And remember – the mule engine is just for shaking down the new chassis!

Is it too early to ask Santa for one of these?

About the author

Jason Reiss

Jason draws on over 15 years of experience in the automotive publishing industry, and collaborates with many of the industry's movers and shakers to create compelling technical articles and high-quality race coverage.
Read My Articles

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