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Video: Survival Motorsports FE 526-Cube Stroker Makes 621 Horsepower

The original Ford FE Engine is a V8 that was built between 1958 and 1976, and was considered a “medium-block” engine that was designed to fill the gap between the small-block Y-Block engine and the big-block 385-series engines. It originally powered Ford’s midsize car and truck lineup like the Mustang, Galaxie, Fairlane, Mercury CougarMercury Cyclone, and the like.

Its thin wall casting was revolutionary for the day, made to reduce the amounts of metal to provide only what was needed for strength and provided a much more consistent “pour”, engine block after engine block. As a result of its consistency and availability, it was used in many of Ford’s own performance engines of the day, and even today receives a great level of support in the aftermarket.

Head_Top_ViewSurvival Motorsports is one of the largest aftermarket supporters of the platform, and Survival’s Barry Rabotnick has been immersed in its late-model development. His engines have been entered in the Jeg’s Engine Masters Challenge, where he’s been able to make over 750 horsepower from one of his machines, all on 91 octane.

Recently Survival Motorsports released their FElony bolt-on cylinder heads, based upon decades of FE-engine development, that consists of a completely new casting design that offers improved power and performance over any of the factory castings. In addition to using a modern-style heart-shaped combustion chamber, many other enhancements have been added to the cylinder head to permit it to outflow any factory high-volume production cylinder head and comparable aftermarket FE heads, as evidenced by the video you see here.

Featuring completely-revised intake ports, the cylinder head was designed by Rabotnick from the outset to work well upon today’s stroker engines that require greater flow and performance. In an “as-cast” configuration, the cylinder head will easily support 500-600 horsepower with ease. 

This particular engine features a 526 cubic-inch displacement, achieved by the use of a Shelby block. With only 10.6:1 compression, the engine achieved an easy 621 horsepower on regular ol’ 93-octane pump fuel and a small hydraulic roller camshaft. Even better – the engine uses an Edelbrock intake manifold with electronic fuel injection, making it the perfect complement to upgrade your old tired carbureted piece. 621 horsepower was the result, achieved at a relatively-low 5400 RPM and 630-plus pound-feet of torque at 4600RPM, so putting this into a lightweight Cobra replica or other suitable platform will result in miles of smiles. Check it out!

 

About the author

Jason Reiss

Jason draws on over 15 years of experience in the automotive publishing industry, and collaborates with many of the industry's movers and shakers to create compelling technical articles and high-quality race coverage.
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